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Al-Hind: The Making of the Indo-Islamic World, Vol. 2, The by Andre Wink PDF

Posted On February 7, 2018 at 2:20 pm by / Comments Off on Al-Hind: The Making of the Indo-Islamic World, Vol. 2, The by Andre Wink PDF

By Andre Wink

ISBN-10: 9004102361

ISBN-13: 9789004102361

Quantity 2 this is often the second one of a projected sequence of 5 volumes facing the growth of Islam in al-Hind, or South and Southeast Asia. whereas the former quantity lined the 7th-11th centuries, this new quantity bargains largely with the Islamic conquest of the 11th-13th centuries. The booklet additionally presents an research of the newly rising organizational varieties of the Indo-Islamic nation in those centuries, migration styles which constructed among the center East, vital Asia and South Asia, maritime advancements within the Indian Ocean, and non secular switch. The comparative and world-historical point of view that's complex the following at the dynamic interplay among nomadic and agricultural societies may still make it of curiosity to all historians enthusiastic about Asia during this interval.

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Additional resources for Al-Hind: The Making of the Indo-Islamic World, Vol. 2, The Slave Kings and the Islamic Conquest, 11th-13th Centuries

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Typically, the steppe empire was very closely tied to the ruler's person, so that when the latter died it stood in danger of immediate collapseP If the steppe ruler could make optimum use of human resources, the resulting strength was, more often than not, ephemeral. Unity would easily be lost in the steppe itself; or, when settled lands were conquered, the nomadic polity would be quickly transformed into a settled state of one type or another. Nonetheless, the aggressiveness which has often been taken as characteristic of nomads in general develops only when a combination of internal and external stimuli and opportunities is present.

46-49. 54 THE COMING OF THE TURKS ... 22 This seems to indicate that by that time they had settled in India, albeit possibly in the periphery of Aryiivarta. Most likely, as horse-keepers they kept to the surrounding semi-arid zones less fit for cultivation. Buddhist authors and the Epics show an early awareness of the people of the area beyond the northern and northwestern frontier which they call 'Shakadvipa'. But it seems futile to try and sift out the basic ethnic units here. If the Indians referred to the tribal confederations of this area as 'Shakas' it is sometimes because this was the oldest name which was applied to them.

77 AI-Hind, I, pp. 115-6. 78 Minorsky, Hudild al-'iilam, p. 348; idem, 'The Turkish dialect of the KhalaJ', Bulletin of the School of African and Oriental Studies, X, 2 (1940), pp. 426-34; A. Ahmad, 'The Early Turkish Nucleus in India', Turcica, IX (1977), pp. 103-6. 79 See, for instance, TFM, p. 47. 80 TFS, pp. 175-6. 81 Cf. AI-Hind, I, pp. 13-16. tid) with whom key positions of power were to be shared. The Mongols were also regarded in numerous Muslim texts as 'Turks' (Atrak), or as belonging to the same stock or ethnicity (jins) or having very close relations with the Turks, and these bonds were regarded as generating strong feelings of ethnic affinity, solidarity or sympathy.

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Al-Hind: The Making of the Indo-Islamic World, Vol. 2, The Slave Kings and the Islamic Conquest, 11th-13th Centuries by Andre Wink


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